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Beijing issues first-ever ‘red alert’ on air pollution

 air pollution

Beijing issued its first-ever red alert for smog, urging schools to close and invoking restrictions on factories and traffic that will keep half of the city's vehicles off the roads. The red alert the most serious warning on a four-tier system adopted in recent years was announced. It means authorities have forecast more than three consecutive days of severe smog.

Readings of PM2.5 particles climbed toward 300 micrograms per cubic meter and are expected to continue rising before the air begins to improve with the arrival of a cold front on 8 dec2015. The World Health Organization designates the safe level for the tiny, poisonous particles at 25.

Along with school closures and limiting cars to driving every other day depending on the last number of their license plate, a raft of other restrictions will seek to reduce the amount of dust and other particulate matter in the city of 22.5 million people. Officials said extra subway trains and buses would be added to handle the additional strain on public transport.

It's the second time this month that notoriously polluted Beijing has experienced a prolonged bout of smog, sending PM2.5 levels in the suburbs as high as 976 micrograms. Beijing was also shrouded in persistent smog for most of November, when power demand soared due to unusually cold weather. While pollution in the capital improved slightly in the first 10 months of the year, heavy smog that can be seen from outer space regularly forces Beijing schools to suspend outdoor activities and can even prompt highway closures because of reduced visibility.