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Tsai Ing-wen elected as first female President of Taiwan

 Taiwan

 

The people of Taiwan elected their first female President a bookish technocrat who has vowed to put domestic concerns above deepened ties with China, which are increasingly seen here as a poisoned chalice. Tsai Ing-wen, a U.S.- and U.K.-trained scientist, and leader of the Beijing-skeptic Democratic Progressive Party (DPP), took some 56% of the vote to end eight years of Nationalist Party (Kuomintang or KMT) rule blighted by anemic growth and soaring inequality.

In the 2016 general elections, DPP which leads the camp that wants independence from China led by Tsai Ing-wen emerged victorious with 56% of the total vote share. She defeated Eric Chu of the ruling Kuomintang (KMT) Party that secured 31% vote share. China sees Taiwan as a breakaway province (island) which will one day be reunited with the mainland. China also has threatened to take back by force, if necessary. The two sides had split in 1949 after then nationalist KMT party had lost to the Chinese Communist Party (CCP) under Mao Zedong and had set up a new government in Taiwan. The KMT Party has ruled Taiwan for almost past 70 years and has overseen improved relations with China in recent times.